Thursday, July 21, 2016

Civil War History: The Battle of Bull Run


Today in 1861 the first major battle of the Civil War took place in Virginia, the Battle of Bull Run. Both the Union and the Confederacy had inexperienced, fledgling armies at this early start of the war, which resulted in numerous mishaps and severe casualties. This battle also set the tone of the war, showing it would be a long and bloody war. Primarily led by Brigadier General Irvin McDowell on the Union side and Brigadier General P.G.T. Beauregard leading the Confederate forces. Both sides were plagued by difficulties like poor communication and an inability to execute overly complex commands. After receiving reinforcements, the Confederates won the battle, forcing the Union soldiers into massive retreat. Although ultimately the South would lose the war, this is also a significant battle in that it is where Confederate Colonel Thomas J. Jackson would earn the moniker "Stonewall Jackson".

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Slicing history, the Khukuri way


In today’s times, fossils from eons ago, mummified bodies from a hazy past, and other relics from history feel like time capsules. The aura of objects from the past permeates through and thrills us, perhaps, more strongly than the legends, the stories and their documented histories. The touch of something old holds a memory, and its possession an experience.
The khukuri knife from Nepal, an outstanding item curated by Atlanta Cutlery, is one such weapon from a distant time period that continues to fascinate ardent lovers of knives and collectors. Sourced from 19th century Nepal, these khukuris are best held bare in your hands to soak in their latent power and past energies.
Nepal resisted colonization by the British, with its ferocious Gurkhas (Nepali soldiers) and a rugged terrain protecting her pristineness. The grandness of the British weapons and their fighting mechanism were no match for them or the rawness of the khukuri knives and local guns. A legend goes that the Gurkhas were once even willing to supply ammunitions on loan to the British troop which had surrendered after running out of ammunitions!
These pieces of the past hold secrets for those who care enough to dig deeper. Atlanta Cutlery offers you khukuri knives, bayonets, spare parts and accessories, which bear bruises of history, buried under the sands of time, dust and earth, oil and grease. Ironically, these would be startling departures in any weapon collection amidst shiny blades and refined mechanisms. Rule your inner world, and reclaim a piece of history to make it exclusively yours!
 

Sunday, July 17, 2016

Constant Care Will Maintain Your Gear!



Wield your wondrous LARP weapons to fight evil, rain or shine! However, after you've won, make it a point to clean your equipment! Similar to other props and costume pieces, LARP weapons of all sorts also require proper maintenance and management. It is imperative that you keep your collection maintained to ensure their durability and promote a longer lifespan. Here are some of the basic maintenance checkpoints to keep your goods intact and ready for use:

1. Always try to keep your LARP weapons flat on the surface, rather than standing them in a vertical position. If vertical storage is unavoidable, resting the boffer on the pommel will cause the least amount of damage.

2. Cover your completely dry latex piece with a cloth bag or sheet to avoid touching or making contact with other items. The lining ensures your weapon doesn't stick to any unwanted surface.

3. When dirty, make sure to wipe the latex of your LARP weapon with a lightly dampened cloth, before putting it down. Leave it out to dry for a bit and then it is ready to store!

4. Although LARP items are made for outdoor usage, they still need shelter to keep them in pristine condition. Especially the weapons made from latex and boffer material. Excess sunlight (UV rays) or moisture will cause the weapons to fade and dry rot. Do try to store your weapons in a dry place and out of direct sunlight.

5. If you somehow find your product punctured, cut or torn, you can buy a latex­ based adhesive and jot the foam back together. Remember to get yourself a sealant once the repair has dried off, that will ensure the repaired wound is sealed. It will keep your weapon waterproof, just like before.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Turning Chores into Conquests


The falcata, the kopis, the kindjal...these are the names of weapons from an era long since past, but they remain relevant today. The Windlass Cobra Steel Collection is made up of these iconic and traditional blade styles, adapted and reformed into functioning tools for everyday use. Hand forged with high grade, X46Cr13, stainless steel, these tempered pieces are able to perform heavy cutting tasks without deforming their shape. Hard rubber scales take the place of traditional wood and leather handles, providing a sure grip that doesn't dig into the hand during labor. All of the items in this line come with a black leather sheath and, with the exception of the wakizashi, can be affixed to a belt through the provided loops. For Windlass this collection has flourished and we want to expand our offerings! Are there particular swords/weapons of history that you would like to see added to Cobra Steel?

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Best Blade Forward


At Atlanta Cutlery, the kukri is serious business. Our parent company, Windlass Steelcrafts, has a thorough history supplying kukris to the Ghurkas, as well as to the public. ACC has brought back several antique kukris from Nepal, dating from pre WWI to post WWII. These might be listed as antiques but when you pick one up, the potential to get back to work is palpable. Our reproduction models enjoy specific notoriety and can be seen at home in the hands of the armed forces, as well as that of film crews. With more and more kukris being displayed by mainstream media, the demand has only gone up! Also available, are some modern innovations to the traditional knife, like Cold Steel's folding Rajah series. It's hard to beat the "wow" factor of bringing a 14" kukri from the confines of your pocket! More recently, we brought on the Ka-Bar kukri inspired by our sister company's late founder, Hank Reinhardt. This blade holds special sentimental value to those of us, who had the pleasure of being able to learn from a man of such great passion. However, you decide to use your kukri, whether for display, for labor, or for combat, Atlanta Cutlery has kukris in all shapes, sizes and price ranges!

Monday, July 4, 2016

Forming Folders


Folding knives have been around for ages and are constantly evolving with the times. New innovations abound in knife steel, locking mechanisms, assisted opening releases and efficient multi functions. The amount of new steel types is harder than ever to keep up with, like the 7Cr17MoV found in the S&W Border Guard XK. At 54-56 RC this is tough stuff but you might need a degree in metallurgy to notice the small differences in Molybdenum or Vanadium. Cold Steel has brought some serious locking power with the advent of the Tri-ad® lock, found in knives like the Mini AK-47. Touted as the safest and strongest mechanism, it's hard to argue when grown men are doing pull-ups on your knife handles. Most assisted opening releases are by spring these days, but the Camillus Lev-R-Lok actually uses an assist lever! Pressing down on the side of the knife will give you an assist, that is completely manual. When you carry your knife everyday, you use it more. So, naturally, the more it can reliably do, all the better! The Double Plier Multi-Tool from Windlass is just that kind of blade. Having various driver bits is expected in a multi-function knife, but getting functional pliers is the best kind of bonus. Pliers are a great tool to have on hand, and the less space it takes up, the more likely you are to carry it. Keep on checking with Atlanta Cutlery for knives that break the mold!

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Constructing Cutlery


The materials used in knife making is a topic of conversation, that is quite open to the imagination. Virtually every solid has been shaped into the form of knife for at least curiosity, if not practical use. Iron, copper, nickel, gold, glass, bone, stone, plastic and ceramics have all been used for blades. Some of the intrigue in knife making is finding even more exotic or outlandish materials to use, such as meteoric metals or fossilized scales. The reasons for making a specific style of knife can be just as varied as the material. From a working knife, that can perform an intended purpose or a custom artwork specifically suiting a personal taste. Even the smaller details such as pins, scales, pommels and hilts come in endless variety. To build a knife is a marvelous process that can be as simple or involved as the one crafting it.